Trend Report: Out of this world…

Our love of space goes all the way back to ancient times, when the Greeks mapped out the constellations of the night sky, and as the excitement over this month’s ‘supermoon’ shows, our passion for the astronomical continues today. The moon isn’t the only celestial body holding our interest, continued exploration of Mars has made headlines throughout 2016. Meanwhile, advancements like British astronaut Tim Peake’s six month-long stay at the International Space Station earlier this year makes the crossing of the ‘final frontier’ seem closer than ever.

However, for the moment we earthbound folk are content to get our space-fix wherever we can. Out of this world tales are currently filling the silver and small screens, and we’re even wearing our starry dreams on our sleeves, as designs emblazoned with celestial details parade down the runway, while clothes featuring NASA’s iconic logo have made a splash on the high street.

Space’s influence has also made its way into our homes, inspiring clean, futuristic interior design schemes, galactic prints and zodiac wall art. A simple way to add a subtle touch of the cosmic, several of our glittering Mosaic Fragrance Lamps also have interstellar inspirations behind their designs.

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Dark Side of the Moon

This lamp features sparkling fragments of pink, purple and blue weaved into a nebulous pattern, finely detailed with starry flecks of gold for a cosmic effect.

 

 

 

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Emperor of Mars

Inspired by our planetary neighbour, Emperor of Mars is crafted from glinting pieces of orange black and silver glass that reflect the hot desert surface of its namesake.

 

 

 

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A Galaxy Far Far Away

This glittering creation blends swirling purples, silvers, yellows and reds, drawn from the dancing colours of faraway galaxies, to form a wonder from the heavens.

 

 

 

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Meteor

A tiny piece of the sparkling universe ready to add dazzle your home. Crafted from mosaic fragments of silver glass, this shining lamp is inspired by the sight of blazing meteors crossing the heavens.